Measurement and Diagnostics

“Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so” – Galileo.

Many of the research efforts in GALCIT are enabled by development of experimental tools to sense and measure physical phenomena in new ways. Ongoing work includes new three-dimensional, three- component image correlation techniques; laser-scattering diagnostic techniques; spectroscopic species and temperature measurements, and time-resolved interferometry for hypervelocity and reacting flows; nano-second exposure, high-framing rate imaging; laser scanning and metric analysis techniques for reconstruction of spatiotemporal instabilities in nanoscale films; dynamic Digital Image Correlation (DIC), ultra-high speed photography and thermography for static and dynamic deformation, localization and fracture in solid materials; strain measurement using Coherent Gradient Sensing (CGS) shearography, laser vibrometry and dynamic photoelasticity; in situ techniques for field measurements in the ocean and atmosphere; and data-driven, machine learning-based measurement approaches.

Faculty

Joanna Austin
Professor of Aerospace

John O. Dabiri
Centennial Professor of Aeronautics and Mechanical Engineering

Paul E. Dimotakis
John K. Northrop Professor of Aeronautics and Professor of Applied Physics

Morteza Gharib
Hans W. Liepmann Professor of Aeronautics and Bioinspired Engineering; Booth-Kresa Leadership Chair, Center for Autonomous Systems and Technologies; Director, Graduate Aerospace Laboratories; Director, Center for Autonomous Systems and Technologies

Beverley J. McKeon
Theodore von Karman Professor of Aeronautics; EAS Division Deputy Chair

Ares J. Rosakis
Theodore von Karman Professor of Aeronautics and Mechanical Engineering

Guruswami (Ravi) Ravichandran
John E. Goode, Jr., Professor of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering; Otis Booth Leadership Chair, Division of Engineering and Applied Science

Sandra M. Troian
Professor of Applied Physics, Aeronautics, and Mechanical Engineering

Joseph E. Shepherd
C. L. "Kelly" Johnson Professor of Aeronautics and Mechanical Engineering